Tag Archives: 1971

The Record Event Of The Year!

Rare Earth record ad, Green Bay Press-Gazette, Sept. 1, 197150 years ago today, on Wednesday, Sept. 1, 1971, this long, tall ad in the Green Bay Press-Gazette proclaimed that “The Record Event Of The Year” was happening at Woolworth’s.

For just $3.68, you could get any one of these three record albums by Rare Earth. (That’s $24.62 in 2021 dollars, and some new records go for that these days, so not much has changed for record buyers in 50 years.)

In the newspaper business, this was known as a co-op ad. In this case, the record company — the Rare Earth label — ponied up the money to hype its records via an ad from Woolworth’s. The label may have paid for part of the ad or all of the ad. Fairly common stuff.

Even though Rare Earth was mostly a singles band as September 1971 began, and even though free-form FM radio was in its infancy, the ad hyped some of Rare Earth’s popular long jams.

Let’s listen!

“#1 One World contains the hit single ‘I Just Want To Celebrate’ and a seven-minute version of the incredibly funky ‘What’d I Say.'”

This was the newest Rare Earth album featured in the ad. “One World” had come out three months earlier, at the beginning of the summer of 1971. It eventually went gold, but didn’t chart as high as the other two albums hyped here, peaking at No. 28 on the Billboard 200.

“#2 Get Ready contains the full 21 minute version of the hit ‘GET READY.'”

“Get Ready” had been released two years earlier, in July 1969, went platinum and reached No. 12 on the Billboard 200. “What’d I Say,” of course, was a Ray Charles cover.

“Get Ready,” the single, also appeared in slightly different form on “Dreams/Answers,” Rare Earth’s obscure debut album from 1968. I wrote about that record last year. Rarest Earth, you might say.

“#3 Ecology contains the complete 10 minute version of the hit ‘(I Know) I’M LOSING YOU.'”

“Ecology” had been released in the winter of 1970, so it was a year and a half old. It went gold and reached No. 15 on the Billboard 200. “(I Know) I’m Losing You,” of course, is a Temptations cover.

Rare Earth’s next record? The mighty “Rare Earth In Concert,” a double LP released in December 1971. It features LONGER versions of everything here except “What’d I Say.” Whether the studio version or the live version, all were free-form FM radio staples in the ’70s. I dug them then and I dig them now.

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Filed under September 2021

Paul’s new group

50 years ago today, on Wednesday, Aug. 4, 1971, news started breaking ever so slowly across America that Paul McCartney, formerly of the Beatles, had a new, unnamed band.

The five-paragraph item that moved on the Associated Press wire that day likely was headlined “McCartney Forms New Pop Group.” (How do I know? That’s the headline that appeared in a bunch of newspapers. Wire editors who were pressed for time, or just lazy, often copied the AP’s headline right into the paper.)

Newspaper clipping on Paul McCartney's new, unnamed band, Aug. 4, 1971

This one is from the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, although I’m trying to decide whether that’s Paul or actor Anthony Zerbe in the photo.

Newspaper clipping about Paul McCartney's new, unnamed band, Aug. 4, 1971

This one is from the News Journal of Wilmington, Delaware, which kinda made Macca’s new group sound like a bunch of allies from The Big One, WWII.

Newspaper clipping on Paul McCartney's new, unnamed band, Aug. 4, 1971

This one is from the Springfield (Missouri) Leader and Press, whose headline said all it needed to say and probably hit hard for those who loved the Beatles.

Paul’s new band, of course, was Wings. “His blonde American wife,” Linda Eastman, was in the band — wow, no sexist or provincial attitudes there, eh? — along with guitarist Denny Laine and drummer Denny Seiwell.

Two days earlier, on Monday, Aug. 2, they’d finished recording their first album at Abbey Road Studios in London. No mention of that, though.

Three days earlier, on Sunday, Aug. 1, Paul’s old mates, George Harrison and Ringo Starr had performed together at the Concert for Bangladesh at Madison Square Garden in New York. 

I wonder whether the news dump about Paul’s new band was intended to keep him in the public eye in the wake of the Concert for Bangladesh, where he was  conspicuously absent. The AP’s report noted that it was the first time George and Ringo, the former Beatles, had played together on a stage in four years. Paul had declined to take part.

Then again, it had been barely three months since the release of Paul and Linda’s “Ram” album, which reviewers panned but fans loved. So perhaps another reason to stay in the public eye.

The debut album not mentioned 50 years ago today is “Wild Life.” It reached No. 10 on the U.S. album charts and went gold. It produced no singles, save for a British promo release of “Love Is Strange,” a Mickey and Sylvia cover. Neither fans nor reviewers were all that excited about “Wild Life.”

There was, however, a 14-year-old kid in Wisconsin who was curious about “Wild Life” upon its release in early December 1971. Curious enough to take a flyer on Paul McCartney’s new record, probably with Christmas money. Taking a flyer on “Wild Life” was no small thing. I had so few albums — I think I had four after buying this one — that I couldn’t chance getting a bad one.

Almost 50 years later, I still have it.

But I’m sitting here, trying to figure out how I might have heard about Wings and “Wild Life,” given that it produced no singles to be played on the Top 40 radio I listened to. Maybe the DJs mentioned it? There was nothing in the paper. Maybe I was just going through the records at Prange’s, saw Paul McCartney on the record jacket, read the liner notes and popped for it.

Today, not everyone remembers or even knows about “Wild Life.” But given that I had only four albums back then, every cut on it is seared into memory.

“Wild Life” ends with Paul writing about John Lennon, from whom he’d been estranged. It’s the best song on the album.

Album cover of "Wild Life" by Wings from 1971.

“Dear Friend,” Wings, from “Wild Life,” 1971.

Audio taken from the record I’ve had for almost 50 years.

 

 

 

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Filed under August 2021, Sounds

Farewell, Satchmo

Louis Armstrong file photo, Associated Press

50 years ago today, on Tuesday, July 6, 1971, the great jazz trumpeter and singer Louis Armstrong died. He was 69.

The last thing he ever recorded was a charming spoken-word rendition of “The Night Before Christmas.” He did so on Friday, Feb. 26, 1971, in the den of his home at 34-56 107th Street in Corona, Queens, New York.

It’s one of our favorites. We share it here on Christmas Eve every year.

Louis Armstrong The Night Before Christmas 45 sleeve

“But I heard him exclaim as he drove out of sight,

‘Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night. A very good night.’

“And that goes for Satchmo, too. (Laughs softly.) Thank you.”

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Filed under July 2021, Sounds

A summer evening with Ike and Tina

Listening to Ike and Tina Turner in their prime is a good way to spend a rainy Saturday afternoon. But of all my records, why that one today?

50 years ago tonight, on Saturday, June 26, 1971, Ike and Tina performed a show at the Dane County Coliseum in Madison, Wisconsin.

Newspaper ad for Ike and Tina Turner concert in Madison, Wisconsin, on June 26, 1971

The show drew a crowd of about 3,500 to the Coliseum, about half full.

Some takeaways from the reviews that appeared in the two Madison papers the following Monday:

— The heavy British rock of the opening act, The Grease Band, “really didn’t belong on the bill” and was nothing to write home about.

— The Kings of Rhythm, Ike and Tina’s backing band, was introduced first. Then the Ikettes, who performed a couple of numbers. Then Ike. And then … “the hardest-working young girl in show business today! … Tina!

— One reviewer notes Tina’s introduction and immediately turns to Tina’s appearance …

Part of review of Ike and Tina Turner show, Madison, Wisconsin, June 26, 1971

Tina Turner is 31. Come on, man.

— The Ike and Tina Turner Revue summons “vicarious white fantasies of Harlem’s Apollo Theater in the early ’60s.” 

OhhhhhhhhhK.

— One reviewer mentions “Rollin’ on the River” as one of the songs performed and declares it “better than the original.” 

Oh, you mean “Proud Mary.” Come on, man.

— Tina ends the Madison show by “dancing off stage in rapid-fire strobelights and a burst of artificial fog.” But that was it. No encore. Which led to this complaint: “There were unfortunately not enough minutes of this hard work. Tina was on stage only about 45 minutes.”

I wouldn’t complain about seeing Ike and Tina Turner for 45 minutes. But had one popped for the best seats, that’s about $36.50 in today’s dollars. Whether 45 minutes of Ike and Tina in their prime is getting your money’s worth, well, that’s a judgment call for the ages.

The emcee tells the Madison crowd that the show will be roughly the same as that heard on “What You Hear Is What You Get,” a live record from Carnegie Hall that’s just about to be released. That’s the record I listened to on this rainy summer afternoon.

“What You Hear Is What You Get,” Ike and Tina Turner, 1971.

What you hear on the record as Tina dances off stage after a furious cover of Otis Redding’s “Respect” is the emcee — the hype man — shouting “Miss Tina Turner and the Ikettes, ladies and gentlemen! Tina Turner and the Ikettes! Miss Tina Turner! Tina Turner! Tina Turner! Tina Turner! Tina Turner! Tina Turner!”

You know a lot of the songs on this record. I don’t know whether they performed this less-often-heard song in Madison, but on the record, Tina, the Ikettes and Ike do a slow burner of a cover of “A Love Like Yours (Don’t Come Knocking Everyday),” which Holland-Dozier-Holland wrote for Martha and the Vandellas.

Dig it!

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Filed under June 2021

Our 3 Christmas wishes

The first wish

Christmas bells, those Christmas bells
Ringing through the land
Bringing peace to all the world
And good will to man

“Snoopy’s Christmas,” the Royal Guardsmen, from “Snoopy and His Friends,” 1967.

In 1965, Charles Schulz started drawing Snoopy as a World War I flying ace battling the Red Baron. But “it reached a point where war just didn’t seem funny,” he told biographer Rheta Grimsley Johnson. Even so, Snoopy and the Red Baron inspired this novelty Christmas song with explosions, with gunfire and with a solid message of hope that came as the Vietnam War escalated.

The second wish

Someday all our dreams will come to be
Someday in a world where men are free
Maybe not in time for you and me
But someday at Christmastime

"Someday at Christmas" LP by Stevie Wonder, 1967.

“Someday at Christmas,” Stevie Wonder, from “Someday at Christmas,” 1967.

My friend Derek reminded me of this one on Christmas Eve morning last year. Thanks, man. When Stevie sings of “men” throughout this one, songwriter Ron Miller clearly means everyone, of any age.

I have this cut on “A Motown Christmas” from 1973, a record we’ve had since we had only a few Christmas records. The others from way back when? “The New Possibility: John Fahey’s Guitar Soli Christmas Album” from 1968 — here’s some of that — and “A Festival Of Carols In Brass” by the Philadelphia Brass Ensemble from 1967.

The third wish

A very Merry Christmas
And a happy new year
Let’s hope it’s a good one
Without any fear

“Happy Xmas (War Is Over),” John Lennon and Yoko Ono, the Plastic Ono Band and the Harlem Community Choir, released as a single, 1971. I’d always had it on “Shaved Fish,” the 1975 compilation LP from Lennon and the Plastic Ono Band, until I found the single.

War is over, if you want it

Merry Christmas, mein friends!

Enjoy your holidays, everyone!

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Filed under Christmas music, December 2020, Sounds